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Lola Loves…

Lola Loves… Rainworks in Seattle

Among the many wonderful attributes Seattle has to offer, there is one small defect in the seaside city’s charm: it rains. A lot. However, an innovative group of three men were inspired by the days of dreary weather, and through this, Rainworks was born. Peregrine Church is a Seattle street artist who creates a unique type of graffiti. With the help of friends Xack Fischer and Forest Tressider, they set about the streets of Seattle at nighttime and, using Always Dry (an environmentally-friendly water deterrent) and stencils, they create designs and hidden messages that only appear when wet. There’s always some controversy around street art in regards to legalities and whether or not it is truly art or simply an act of vandalism. However, I don’t think anyone would argue that the intentions behind Rainworks are nothing but that of positivity. Similar to “when life gives lemons, make lemonade”, Rainworks is creating a ray of sunshine on days that are gloomy in beautifully rainy Seattle.

Lola Loves… Jocelyn Hobbie’s Introspective Women

Despite the bright colours, it's the eyes that draw you in first. Sometimes blank, sometimes bored. Maybe a little judgmental. The expressions are familiar, ones you've seen time and time again, and perhaps you find yourself projecting a bit as you ponder what these girls are thinking. If you think Jocelyn Hobbie's art is intriguing, you're not alone. Her work…

Lola Loves… Julia Geiser’s Dark and Surreal Artwork

Julia Geiser likes animals. We think. They feature so prominently in her collages... but they're also often cross-sectioned. Cut in half, or a few times across the neck. Their faces used as masks, with some suspicious dripping along the sides. Before you call animal services though, just be aware that her human subjects get a similar treatment, and they too,…

Lola Loves… Fiona Roberts’ Creepy Furniture

From a distance, you might wonder if the chair is oddly bedazzled... Wait... Is it looking at you? With its hundred eyes? If you're the type of person that always feels like someone's watching you (cue Rockwell here), you might not want to spend a lot of time with Fiona Robert's curtains either. In this instance, closing the drapes won't…

Lola Loves… Elizabeth Amento’s Swirling Colours

With a simple splash of orange paint and crazy pink swirls,  Elizabeth Amento's mixed media collages will make you forget all those dull winter days. Based in San-Francisco, the artist uses a variety of mediums to create surreal and colourful scenes of the domestic life. In her artist statement, Elizabeth says that she explores the ''relationships, between people, between colors,…

Lola Loves… The First Day of Spring!

Echinopsis. A big word for a for a type of cactus. But not just any type of cactus. It describes a South American flowering variety, which, under the right temperatures, yields huge, colourful, multi-layered blossoms. And while the plant can bloom over and over again, most of the individual flowers last only a day after opening.Photographer Greg Krehel owns about…

Lola Loves… The Museum of Endangered Sounds

Remember the whir of a rewinding tape? The spin of a rotary dial? Maybe you're younger, and the sounds that bring you back are more modern: the Nokia ringtone, or that high pitched ICQ notification (half greeting, half chirp). These sounds, once common to the point of saturation, have slowly faded away with the advent of quieter devices. And while…

Lola Loves… Suzie Stanford’s Quirky Tapestry Chair

Australian designer Suzie Stanford has been collecting old, quirky tapestries that she then turns into wonderful upholstered works of art! The art of tapestry appears to be on the rise, with a growing number of artists taking it into new directions. As she says in her artist statement, "I collect in a magpie-like fashion from auction houses, curio shops and flea markets…

Lola Loves… The Glacier Project

Fire and ice. Two forces so diametrically opposed unite in support of a noble goal: climate change awareness. Called the Glacier Project and designed by native Icelander Brynjar Sigurðarson for PCM Design, these pale blue candles are a palm-sized likeness of their much larger, natural cousins. And like their wetter, colder, cousins, they melt when hot, just like what is happening to the glaciers around the world. It's hard to watch the slow drip of these candles burning without feeling a sense of urgency, spurring you to consider taking immediate action to protect and preserve our natural environment. Likely starting with glaciers. If you'd prefer to relax, pick up some tealights instead.